Nathanael Greene Monument

The Nathanael Greene monument on Johnson Square honors one of America‚Äôs top Revolutionary War officers. Brigadier General Nathanael Greene (1742-1786) was second only to George Washington. Greene and Washington were the only two Continental generals that served throughout the entire American Revolution.  

Greene distinguished himself in the Northern Campaign on the battlefields of Trenton, Princeton, Brandywine, Germantown, and Monmouth. He also served the Army as Quartermaster General, but his greatest contribution to the war came as commander of the Southern Department (1780-1783).  

One of the war's greatest strategists, he successfully waged a war of attrition against the British forces in the South. He led the Southern Army at Guilford Courthouse, Hobkirk's Hill, Ninety-Six, and Eutaw Springs.

In appreciation for his service in the Revolutionary War, Greene was awarded Mulberry Grove Plantation by the grateful state of Georgia. He moved to Savannah with his family after the war, but died a short time later of heat stroke. Originally buried in Colonial Park Cemetery, the remains of Nathanael and his son were moved to Johnson Square in 1902, and reburied in the base of the monument erected in his honor. 

Text from the Nathanael Green Monument:

MAJOR GENERAL NATHANAEL GREENE
BORN IN RHODE ISLAND - 1742
DIED IN GEORGIA - 1786
SOLDIER - PATRIOT
THE FRIEND OF WASHINGTON
THIS SHAFT HAS BEEN REARED BY THE
PEOPLE OF SAVANNAH
IN HONOR OF HIS GREAT SERVICES
TO THE AMERICAN REVOLUTION

Nathanael Greene MarkerNathanael Greene Marker

Text from the Nathanael Greene Monument Historical Marker:

Beneath the monument in this Square repose the remains of Maj. Gen. Nathanael Greene, of Rhode Island, who died near Savannah on June 19, 1786, at Mulberry Grove Plantation which had been granted to him by this State in appreciation of his services in the Revolution.

The 50-foot, white marble obelisk, designed by the well-known architect, William Strickland, was completed in 1830. The original cornerstone was laid here on March 21, 1825, by Greene's old friend, the Marquis de LaFayette. At the dedicatory ceremony General LaFayette said:

"The great and good man to whose memory we are paying a tribute of respect, affection, and regret, has acted in our revolutionary contest a part so glorious and so important that in the very name of Greene are remembered all the virtues and talents which can illustrate the patriot, the statesman, and the military leader..."

General Greene's remains were originally interred in the burial gound now known as Colonial Cemetery. His exact resting place was a matter of doubt and speculation for many years. The remains of the famed Revolutionary hero were found in the Graham vault in 1901, and were reinterred beneath this monument the following year.

025-12 GEORGIA HISTORICAL COMMISSION 1953

From Nathanael Greene Monument back to Monuments and Memorials

Custom Search

Oglethorpe MonumentOglethorpe Monument
Chippewa Square